Micmacs à tire-larigot (2009), Jean-Pierre Jeunet

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The one and only reason I watched Micmacs was because I figured out it was directed by the same person who directed Amélie, another beautifully composed film. You had the same lighting, the same creativeness that flows evenly through. It’s one of the reasons I really enjoyed this film. If I had to think of a color to associate it with Micmacs, it would be emerald green. Weird huh?

The film centers around the Bazil. A funny looking character, with an unfortunate moment that shapes his upbringing- his father was killed trying to defuse a landmine. Take this years later, and you have Bazil working at a video rental store. It’s night time, he hears guns and roaring engines speed past the little shop, he steps out and gets shot in the head by a stray bullet.

He heals, and returns to a job where he has been replaced. This leaves him homeless and he wonders the streets of Paris for two months until a nice man by the name of Slammer finds him and adopts him. He takes Bazil back to his home, which is in a carved out area of the local garbage dump. He’s introduced to a gang of scavengers and that’s where his new life begins. Through events, he discovers that a local arms factory was connected to the death of his father and the bullet that shot into him, and he has a plan shut them down. His new family helps too.

I loved this movie for it’s characters, the creativeness and the strong story line. I also like what the french consider “comedy” and I plan to find more titles to explore it further. It’s light and heavy at the same time, plus you feel good after watching it. How could that not be more of a recommendation?

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